Brother From Another Planet

When you have no budget, a cast of unknowns, and a weird idea, how do you turn it into a movie? Writer/Director John Sayles gives us some guidelines for doing just that with this way off center look at cross cultural science fiction.

brother_from_another_planetIt is hard to imagine the creativity that is required to work within the limitations that this movie seems to have had. In 1984, this was indie movie twice removed. The info I found says that Sayles payed for the film partially with funds from the MacArthur Genius grant he received. He was most known for scriptwriting for Roger Corman films and being an ace script doctor. Oh, and he made the influential “Return of the Secaucus 7″. I’ve only seen four of his movies and this was the first one I saw in a theater.

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1984-a-thon Day 4

70srichard:

Day Four has films that are down the road for this project (Dune, Teachers, Little Drummer Girl) and several that I have already covered (Karate Kid, Rhinestone, Ghostbusters). Do some comparison and look forward to whats coming up on Day 4 of the Blogathon.

Originally posted on Forgotten Films:

1984_blogathonI just can’t tell you how thrilled I am with the amazing reviews coming out of the 1984-a-thon. What can I say, movie bloggers rock! Here is today’s awesome batch of reviews:

– To start today, the latest episode of The LAMBcast features yours truly joining four other movie bloggers for a 1984 Movie Draft.

– The sleeper has awakened…Large Popcorn No Butter reivews Dune.

– Who ya gonna call? Jay from Life Vs. Film and his review of Ghostbusters.

– Break out the pocket protectors as Hooray For Movies looks at Revenge of the Nerds.

– Could Betamax Nights really be Captain Chaos? He reviews Cannonball Run II.

– Today I Watched a Movie sweeps the leg and reviews The Karate Kid.

– Le Mot du Cinephiliaque reviews John Cassavetes’ Love Streams.

– To the Escape Hatch tangles with HAL 9000 and…

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1984-a-thon Day 3

70srichard:

Day Three, check out Dan Heaton’ s post on Greystoke, then for a counter view visit my post on the film in March. I’m having fun, hope you all are too.

Originally posted on Forgotten Films:

1984_blogathonThe reviews for the 1984-a-thon have been just fantastic so far! We’ve got a bunch of new ones for you today. Remember to keep on sharing, tweeting, and commenting on these great posts. Here we go!

– Richard at Scopophilia checks into The Hotel New Hampshire.

– Vic’s Movie Den looks at John Carpenter’s Starman.

– Cenobite Me experiences Night of the Comet.

– Take flight on a luck dragon with Nick from French Toast Sunday and The Neverending Story.

– Joel Burman IS Missing in Action.

– I Love Terrible Movies digs deep into the Frankenstein family tree with Frankenstein’s Great Aunt Tillie.

– Mike from E Street Film Society looks at James Garner in Tank.

– Justin at Man I Love Films ain’t fallin’ for the banana in the tailpipe trick and reviews Beverly Hills Cop.

– Nolahn at Your…

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1984-a-thon Day 2

70srichard:

Day 2 of the 1984 Blogathon on Forgotten Films. More great 1984 film posts.

Originally posted on Forgotten Films:

1984_blogathonWell, our first day of the 1984-a-thon was huge! It resulted in the 2nd busiest day in the nearly 3 year history of Forgotten Films. We’re just getting started, though. Here are today’s awesome contributions:

– Durnmoose Movie Musings examines Woody Allen’s Broadway Danny Rose.

– The Roarbots hits Broadway with Kermit and the gang in The Muppets Take Manhattan.

– The Movie Waffler looks in the trunk and discovers Repo Man.

– In the same year as Ghostbusters, Bill Murray also had his first dramatic film. Lauren at Suddenly a Shot Rang Out reviews The Razor’s Edge.

– Cinema Escapes reviews Academy Award nominee The Killing Fields.

– Gore Girl’s Dungeon heads to Tromaville to meet The Toxic Avenger.

– Daniel from E Street Film Society cranks up the Phil Collins title song and reviews Against All Odds.

– Bubbawheat from Flight…

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1984-a-thon Day 1

70srichard:

I can’t get to everything that was out this year, but Todd appears to have it covered with the Blogathon. Try to visit some sites and see the great year that 1984 was from different perspectives.

Originally posted on Forgotten Films:

1984_blogathonWell, here we go! The 1984-a-thon is in full swing. Each day I’ll post links to several of the reviews being posted by our awesome group of contributors. Be sure to visit, link, comment, tweet, etc. Here is a our first batch of reviews. Enjoy!

– It’s only fitting that in 1984 there was a film adaptation of George Orwell’s 1984. Let’s Go to the Movies watches along with Big Brother…1984.

– Talkie Gazette examines the year’s best picture winner: Amadeus.

-Redhead at the Movies reminds us to keep them out of the light, don’t get them wet, and never feed them after midnight with her review of Gremlins.

– Cinematic Catharsis takes a look at Werner Herzog’s Where the Green Ants Dream.

– Nick at Your Face reviews the debut of the Coen Brothers, Blood Simple.

– The Droid Your Looking For looks…

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Tightrope

When people hear the name of Clint Eastwood, there are usually two images that pop into their heads. He is the stoic police detective with a big gun, pursuing justice in whatever form, or he is an avenging cowboy, sometimes a crook sometimes a hero but always dangerous. Even after directing films well out of both genres and not appearing in one for a dozen years, those images will remain. Between 1971 and 1988 he played Inspector “Dirty” Harry Callahan five times. During that period he played a cop in three other movies including a lampoon of himself in “City Heat”. As Detective Wes Block in the movie “Tightrope” Eastwood goes in a very different direction than all the other cops he has played.

posterBlock is investigating a series of homicides that are connected to the underground sex trade in the New Orleans area. This is a problem for him because after his wife left him, Block has turned to that world for sexual release and some power over women, the same characteristics that seem to be driving the killer. He has to face his own demons and try to understand the nature of a man who humiliates women in an attempt to stop him.

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Steven Spielberg Blogathon: Directing Actors

Steven Spielberg is rightly credited with being the most effective visualizer of stories working in the last forty years. He took a liability like a non-functioning mechanical shark and managed to create an extremely visceral film out of it. That “Jaws” works is largely a function of his ability to feel how a movie will play to an audience. He took the extra step when making that film, of shooting additional material in the pool of one of his collaborators, to get the audience reaction right. The opening of “Raiders of the Lost Ark” is a litany of visual and emotional elements from the Saturday serialized films of the Golden Age, but updated and intensified as only Spielberg has been able to manage. The brutality and honesty of the first half hour of “Saving Private Ryan” is a testament to being able to connect with an audience’s emotions in the strongest possible ways. Plenty of horror films have been as graphic and disturbing, but none have carried the power of those horrifying images the way that this World War II film managed to do. Continue reading